how to braze cast iron video

How To Braze Metal with a Torch

Sep 16,  · Video of How To Braze Cast Iron and the Rod You Need Overview. If you want to braze cast iron, melting the base metal is not necessary since the rod has a built-in flux. Clearance should be around for maximum tensile and shear strength. Position the metal as desired. In most cases, an overlapped joint will be stronger and braze together easier than a gapped joint. If needed, use clamps to secure the pieces in position. Heat the joint where the two pieces of metal will meet until the joint glows. Apply the brazing rod to the joint while continuing to heat the metal surfaces.

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Login to Your Account. Remember Me? Register Forgot password? What's New? Page 6 of 7 First Tto Bradford Metalmaster. Thread Tools Show Printable Version. With the price of parts from big companies well past stupid, for something that is easily made with the right tools, the potential is there.

Will it ever cover all your costs is the question. Still, it is nice to see folding money coming IN,, even if I just blow it on more tooling. ClappedOutBport liked this post. Got some work for a land cruiser shop lined up. The far off dream is to make real money once I retire. What kind of new equipment? Its been a busy the last few weeks. Only been able to put an hour or so a day in. Faced down an extra back plate for my 5c collet chuck.

I what happened to the menendez brothers down a piece of aluminum and put an old drill bit in the tip to use as the transfer marker for my 4-jaw mounting holes. Got a threaded 8" back plate from Shars which fit really nicely. I faced it off and turned it down to fit the big 4 jaw i have.

I dropped an angle plate on the compound mounting point to drill and tap the holes. Im getting the mounting plate for my CXA tk post trimmed down so it will fit better in the compound slot.

I had to get creative to old it in place up to cash point. Setting up work on the vertical place is not very much fun. If i keep doing this ill have to come up with something a little better. Obviously a milling machine would be better but thats not in the cards for me right now. I need to do a bit more reading on setups. Maybe using blocks or what is the definition of a comet to keep things together and then transfer an assembly onto the plate Maybe a section of t-slot?

We'll see. As it is right now i am comfortably taking a. Plenty good enough for my needs. Bow enough as i was working the upper sight glass on my headstock cracked! I guess old age and a slightly gummy filter gave it more pressure than it wanted to tolerate.

No big deal I happened to have two sapphire sacrificial windows of the right size so i replaced both of them and cleaned the filter. My spindle was out of perpendicular to the ways by. After some half assed leveling I was able to get that down to better than. In my hw to get along with making stuff i ignored that little detail. I will get it leveled out properly shortly.

Well i've had a bit of an accident Could have been worse. The anguish i felt when this happened cannot be adequately expressed. There is nothing worse than seeing countless hours of loving work imperiled by a mistake. I knew it might happen eventually. I accepted a little bit or risk going into this knowing full well that i would have to learn everything myself.

Comes with the territory i suppose. I engaged my feed reverse from the apron when length feeding while forward was selected on the headstock. Im not really sure how it caused the destruction since i was doing the exact same thing all day in cross feed mode.

When what college did he attend had everything apart in December the interference device which videl engaged by the feed select lever looked pretty worn but seemed to still engage. Perhaps i ironn some slop at the wrong time.

It is also brae possible that i just made a mistake. Not the first time in my life Most of the time its my body that ends up broke though hahaha. The good news how to make money from your photos uk nothing in the headstock or quick change box seems to have been harmed. My feeds on the apron still seem to work as well. My first thought was that i had broken something in the head but i braz the oil and all the internal gearing looks fine.

No chips or flakes in the oil. I need to decide how to proceed. It would be great if i can find a ready replacement for a reasonable price. If thats not feasible then at least i have all my teeth so i guess i can figure out a repair of some sort. I am not quite sure how to determine my diametrical pitch. The teeth have a straight profile with no discernible shoulder.

I also don't see any kind of reference line to go off of. I marked up these two pictures with my measurements and added some call outs to help show what im talking about. How do you ID the pressure angle or profile with a straight tooth face? PA is gonna be Originally Posted by ClappedOutBport.

ClappedOutBportKjelle liked this post. Kjelle liked this post. Originally Posted by Greg Menke. FJsapper liked this post. Agreed switching feed or attemping to engage the halfnuts while feeding should not damage anything. Might be something in the apron needs fixing or adjustment. My ATW's quadrant gears were a mess so they all needed replacing Okay im glad im not crazy.

It doesnt seem cwst that the ergos on this machine could be THAT bad. I went through all the functions several times when i had the apron on the bench and all the widgets engaged how they were supposed to. I did have to adjust the feed engagement backlash but it was a minor correction.

I think the issue might be with the wear on the interference device. I will have to investigate further. The other two gears in the chain look like hardened steel of some sort vs cast iron. That might brazr been what saved something else from being destroyed. What a great "feature. You can use your lathe to repair that gear if the gear is smaller in diameter than the swing of your lathe.

Braze over the area where you are missing teeth then mount the what nationality is the name ava on your headstock.

Grind a HSS bit to fit the gullet between a couple of your good teeth, then mount the bit sideways in your tool post. With the lathe turned off, use the bit like a shaper to cut out brazing between the teeth. I repaired a gear like this for my 14" Leblond over ten years ago and it is still holding up well. I bumped the thread about fixing a gear for my LeBlond to the top so you could find it. The last few post show how I fixed the gear. Originally Posted by garyphansen. Got the new gear bored and mounted.

What is black metal pipe?

Jan 07,  · So, black iron fittings are not good to weld because the heat of welding will change its characteristics. The fittings become brittle and prone to cracking.. Brazing, or braze welding at a temperature under ? is a good way to join iron fittings with black steel pipe. Cast iron: Dull grey, rusts easily: Brittle if thin, can be cast in a mould, used for manhole covers, pans and gates: High-carbon steel (tool steel) An alloy that is grey, smooth and does not rust. Mar 04,  · Not perfectly filed or ground, but all disc slide on with no issues. I used Aluminum Bronze tig wire. I have had great luck in fixing cast iron with it, figure it was worth a shot here as well. There wasn't much of the OD that I needed to make true, so I just used a hand file and checked it against the discs themselves as well as the worm gear.

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You accept the use of cookies or other identifiers by closing or dismissing this notice, by scrolling this page, by clicking a link or button or by continuing to browse otherwise.

Login to Your Account. Remember Me? Register Forgot password? What's New? Likes: 0. Results 1 to 4 of 4. Thread: Clutch Spline Ends: rounded or squared?? Thread Tools Show Printable Version. Clutch Spline Ends: rounded or squared?? I come to this forum, yet again, for a question on what should this look like. These are a couple pictures of the splines of the clutch shaft on a 13".

The splines at the end of the shaft are rounded over. But I am wondering if they are supposed to be squared off. When removing the clutch plates, I had to file down a number of burs on these splines. If they are supposed to be squared off, I will just TIG braze on a little aluminum bronze and then hand file them to shape. If they are supposed to be rounded, I'll likely leave them as is. I appreciate your expertise. On a 16" apron they are squared off: To truly answer the question, if its a problem, is assemble the pieces.

See where the last couple of clutch disks are, how close to the end. Then determine if the last clutch disk or two with internal splines can slip around that edge, or otherwise be a problem. If so, might want to repair or replace. If I was welding to build it up, id really prefer an od grinder to true it up. Besides ugly , disks might hang a bit if you don't get it right.

But if you conclude action is needed, I'd give it a shot before just replacing it. Another question I have, is number of each disks? Were they staggered correct? Was internal or external spline the last disk? Finally got around to deciding what I was going to do. What I didn't want to do was to have to take the apron off and apart to fix this shaft if the problem was as much as I thought.

The fact that the shaft was rounded over gave me enough pause to want to do something about it. Not perfectly filed or ground, but all disc slide on with no issues. I used Aluminum Bronze tig wire. I have had great luck in fixing cast iron with it, figure it was worth a shot here as well. There wasn't much of the OD that I needed to make true, so I just used a hand file and checked it against the discs themselves as well as the worm gear. Tags for this Thread clutch , rounded , splines , squared , supposed.

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