how to teach mathematics to children

Ten Creative Ways to Teach Math

Help children to recognize, name, and compare shapes, and then teach them to combine and separate shapes. Encourage children to look for and identify patterns, and then teach them to extend, correct, and create patterns. Promote childrens understanding of measurement by teaching them to make direct comparisons. Double Impact: Mathematics and Executive Function. Modify activities according to these principles and suggestions. Avoiding the Ineffective Keyword Strategy. Try these meaningful alternative approaches to helping students make sense of word problems.

Here are some activities for your classroom to add a bit of sparkle and creativity. As children work, ask critical questions such as "Did you try this? Create a List. List Name Save. Rename this List. Rename this list. List Name Delete from selected List.

Save to. Save to:. Save Create a List. Create a list. Save Back. The Teacher Store Cart. Checkout Now. Grades PreKK. Use dramatizations. Invite children pretend to be in a ball sphere or box rectangular prismfeeling the faces, edges, and corners and to dramatize simple arithmetic problems such as: Three frogs jumped in the pond, then one more, how many are there in all? Use children's bodies. Suggest that children show how many feet, mouths, and so on they have.

When asked to show their "three arms," they respond loudly in protest, and then tell the adult how many they do have and show "prove" it. Then invite children hlw show numbers with fingers, starting with the familiar, "How old are you? Use children's play. Engage children in block play what is the difference between cornstarch and tapioca starch allows them to do mathematics in numerous ways, including sorting, seriating, creating symmetric designs and buildings, making patterns, and so forth.

Then introduce a game of Dinosaur Shop. Suggest that children pretend to buy and sell toy dinosaurs or other small objects, learning counting, arithmetic, and money concepts. Use children's toys. Encourage children to use "scenes" and toys to act out situations such as three cars on the road, or, later in the year, two monkeys in the trees and two on the ground. Use children's xhildren. Share books with children that address mathematics but are also good stories.

Later, help children see mathematics in any book. Use children's natural creativity. Children's ideas about mathematics should be discussed with all children. Here's a "mathematical conversation" between two boys, each 6 years of age: "Think of the biggest number you can.

Now add five. Then, imagine if you had that many cupcakes. Ask children to describe how they would figure out problems such as getting just enough scissors for how to have chubby cheeks without gaining weight table or how many snacks they would need if a guest were joining the group. Encourage them to use their own fingers or manipulatives or whatever else might be handy for problem solving.

Use a variety of strategies. Bring mathematics everywhere you go in your classroom, from what does rhythm mean in a poem children at morning teahc to setting the table, to asking children to clean up a given number or shape of items.

Also, use a research-based curriculum to incorporate a sequenced series of learning activities into your program. Use technology. Try digital cameras to record children's mathematical work, in their play and in planned activities, and then use the photographs to aid discussions and reflections with children, curriculum planning, and communication with parents.

Use computers wisely to mathematize situations mathemativs provide individualized instruction. Use assessments to measure children's mathematics learning. Use observations, discussions with children, and small-group activities to learn about children's mathematical thinking and to make informed decisions about what each child might dhildren able to learn from future experiences. Also try computer assessments. Use programs that assess children automatically.

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Teaching in today's mixed-ability classroom can be a challenge. These days, it's not uncommon to find a wide range of abilities in the one classroomfrom students struggling to grasp new concepts, to those who are way ahead of their peers from day one.

This factor has contributed to a range of problems for early math learners, including a large achievement gap between students. Read more about how students can benefit from technology that supports differentiated instruction. While individual students do benefit from different learning styles, there are a range of effective strategies which can help all students to succeed. Additionally, the highly engaging, self-paced Mathseeds program offers a research-based solution for mixed-ability K2 math classrooms, making math fun, interactive, and personalized for young learners.

Start your free trial now. Elementary math can be difficult because it involves learning new, abstract concepts that can be tricky for children to visualize. Try to imagine what it's like for a five-year-old to see an addition problem for the very first time. Since it's a totally new concept to them, it can be hard for them to visualize a scenario where one quantity is added to another. Manipulatives are hands-on tools that make math a lot easier for young children to understand.

Tools like Lego, clay, and wooden blocks can all be used in the classroom to demonstrate how math ideas work. For example, Lego is a great way to demonstrate number building, operations, fractions, sorting, patterns, 3D shapes, and more.

While students will come across countless graphs and visuals in their math textbooks, research shows this isn't the only place they should be utilized. According to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, the most powerful way to use graphics in elementary math is in conjunction with specific practice or guidance, either from a teacher or another classroom tool such as Mathseeds.

It's important that students feel comfortable and are given the opportunity to learn new math ideas at their own pace, without feeling rushed. But while the idea that 'given enough time, every student will learn' is nothing new, it's easier said than done. Mastery learning is about giving students as much time as they need to grasp a specific skill or concept.

It involves varying the time you give each student to succeed. Technology-based classroom tools offer a powerful way to differentiate learning while teaching elementary math, which is an effective way to help students in mixed-ability classrooms to succeed. Learn more here. Have you ever noticed how much more confident you feel about a concept after explaining it to someone else? Meta-cognition is the process of thinking about your options, choices, and results, and it has a big impact on the way students learn.

Before assigning a math problem, ask students to brainstorm problem-solving strategies they can use. Encourage students to work together to suggest different strategies in a respectful way. This process can be carried out at every stage of problem solving when teaching elementary math. Once students have offered an answer, ask them to verbalize step-by-step how they got that answer.

Incorporate story problems into your classroom lessons allow students to see how certain math concepts can apply to real life. Story problems are also a good way to help students understand how to use math in everyday life, and see the relevance of math.

Mathseeds provides colorful end-of-lesson books as part of its online program. Many of these are designed so students read the problem, work through it independently, and then turn to the next page to see the solution. Elementary math teachers should normally begin each lesson with a 'show and tell. These days, teachers can really kick 'show and tell' up a notch with an interactive whiteboard, using animations, and videos to clearly show and tell specific math concepts in an engaging and interesting way.

Let your students know how they have performed on a specific task, along with helpful ways that they can further improve and extend their skills. Remember, feedback is different to praise. Focus your feedback on the task itself rather than the student and make sure they have a clear understanding of what they did well and how they can improve next time.

In Carol Dweck's research around what's known as the 'growth mindset', she writes:. It is about telling the truth about a student's current achievement and then, together, doing something about it, helping him or her become smarter.

Do you teach elementary math? Mathseeds is the research-based online math program specifically designed for students in grades K2. Created by a highly experienced team of elementary teachers, Mathseeds provides self-paced lessons, automated reporting, and a range of teaching tools to help your elementary math students succeed.

Sign up for a free trial today. Toggle navigation. Sign Up. Back to Articles 7 Effective Strategies for Teaching Elementary Math Teaching math in a mixed-ability classroom should take into account different learning abilities.

Here are seven effective strategies for teaching elementary math: 1. Make it hands-on Elementary math can be difficult because it involves learning new, abstract concepts that can be tricky for children to visualize. Use visuals and images While students will come across countless graphs and visuals in their math textbooks, research shows this isn't the only place they should be utilized.

The Mathseeds online math program uses colorful visuals, graphics, and catchy songs to clearly demonstrate elementary math concepts in a fun and engaging way. Students can revisit lessons until they fully understand each topic.

Free trial. Find opportunities to differentiate learning It's important that students feel comfortable and are given the opportunity to learn new math ideas at their own pace, without feeling rushed. Ask students to explain their ideas Have you ever noticed how much more confident you feel about a concept after explaining it to someone else?

Incorporate storytelling to make connections to real-world scenarios When it comes to igniting the interest of young minds, not much comes close to a good story. The Mathseeds online math program uses animated story problems to help students apply new math skills to real-world situations.

Show and tell new concepts Elementary math teachers should normally begin each lesson with a 'show and tell. Let your students regularly know how they're doing Feedback is an important part of teaching elementary math and improving students' results.